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19 December 2018


May answers questions by Parliamentarians

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Theresa May has blamed the "Syrian regime" for an alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria's Douma. She has set out her justification at the House of Commons for joining the US and France in launching military airstrikes in Syria on April 14, without parliament's approval.

Axar.az reports citing sputniknbews.com.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May addressed parliamentarians over Britain's involvement in the US-led missile attack on Syria on April 14, which has been harshly criticized by the public and several politicians, including Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn.

A number of MPs have earlier criticized the PM for avoiding parliamentary debate prior to engaging the country in a military attack abroad.

Theresa May has blamed the "Syrian regime" for an alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria's Douma. She has set out her justification at the House of Commons for joining the US and France in launching military airstrikes in Syria on April 14, without parliament's approval.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May addressed parliamentarians over Britain's involvement in the US-led missile attack on Syria on April 14, which has been harshly criticized by the public and several politicians, including Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn.

A number of MPs have earlier criticized the PM for avoiding parliamentary debate prior to engaging the country in a military attack abroad.
Britain joined its allies — the US and France — in launching missile strikes in Syria on April 14 in response to an alleged chemical weapons attack in Douma. The attack has been criticized for hampering the efforts of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to conduct investigations on the ground.

According to Theresa May, who gave a statement on Syria after the airstrikes launch, "a significant body of information including intelligence indicates the Syrian regime is responsible for this latest attack."

In an interview with the BBC, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov questioned the Western leaders' sources of information on Syria:

"I can't be impolite in regard to the heads of other countries, but you're citing leaders of the US, the UK and France. Speaking frankly, all proofs that they're referring to, based on media and social networks," Mr. Lavrov said.

Historical Precedent

There is no legal requirement for the commander in chief — Theresa May — to receive parliamentary approval to authorize military action. However, numerous precedents in the past set a pattern of British leaders holding a House of Commons debate prior to engaging UK forces in military operations.

In 2003, the Parliament was asked to approve military deployment in Iraq, following the motion led by then PM Tony Blair. The motion was carried by 412 votes to 149.

In 2011, the House of Commons voted by 557 to 13 to support the government motion for the use of force against the Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

In 2013, then Prime Minister David Cameron called for military response in Syria followed a suspected chemical weapons attack on 21 August. He lost the motion by 285-272, which ruled out joining US-led strikes.

In 2015, British MPs voted to authorize UK's participation in airstrikes against Daesh militants in Syria. The vote saw 397 to 223 politicians in favor of military action.

Date
2018.04.16 / 19:45
Author
Axar.az
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