Axar.az
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20 September 2018


US reopens 1955 case of black boy's lynching

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The Donald Trump administration has reopened the case of a 14-year-old black boy whose brutal slaying over half a century ago helped to spur the civil rights movement.

Axar.az reports citing AP.

Emmett Till was lynched in 1955 after a white 21-year-old woman in Mississippi falsely accused him of making unwanted sexual advances on her.

Carolyn Bryant, who along her husband, Roy, owned the grocery store where she claimed Till's impropriety took place, has since acknowledged her accusations against Till were false.

But her acknowledgement came decades too late. The 14-year-old Till was kidnapped at a relative's house shortly after Bryant made the accusations. He was taken from the home where he was staying while visiting from Chicago by Roy Bryant and his half-brother who then tied the teen up and put him in the back of his pickup truck.

Till's bloated, mutilated corpse was found four days later in a river. His mother insisted on an open-casket funeral so others could see the state of her son, and photos of Till's body added to simmering outrage.

No one was ever convicted for Till's slaying. An all-male, all-white jury acquitted Roy Bryant and his half-brother, John William Milam, of the Till's murder.

Milam and Bryant later admitted during a magazine interview that they kidnapped and then murdered Till, but were never retried.

Date
2018.07.12 / 22:50
Author
Axar.az
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