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Nauru migrants: Last four children to leave island for US

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Australia says the last four migrant children detained at a camp on the Pacific island of Nauru are being moved to the US.

Axar.az reports citing BBC.

The children will be flown with their families as part of a resettlement deal agreed with Washington.

Australia has held asylum seekers arriving by sea on Nauru since detentions began there in 2013.

Last August it held 109 children. Australia refused to resettle them under its tough immigration policies.

In a statement issued on Sunday, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said "every asylum seeker child has now been removed from Nauru... or has a clear path off the island".

He said that children would no longer be detained there.

he organisers of a campaign to have all children removed from Nauru and resettled, #KidsOffNauru, welcomed the news, saying it gave children a "safe and permanent home" and the "chance to just be kids".

Since 2013, the Australian navy has been ordered to tow or turn back asylum seeker's boats.

Under the controversial policy, people have been detained in centres on Nauru and Manus Island in Papua New Guinea.

According to the latest figures provided by the Refugee Council of Australia, more than 1,200 asylum seekers were believed to still be on the islands in November. About 600 people were believed to be on each island.

Date
2019.02.03 / 22:18
Author
Axar.az
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